Stop the Greed

As a fan base we have been badly let down by our club this season. The turmoil on the pitch has been matched off it when it comes to ticket prices and policies. True fans have been exploited with massive price increases, a lack of concession and youth tickets and the strange policy of selling tickets to members (open to everyone) before STHs. We don’t have to look further than the Liverpool game last week as an example of how badly the club are failing when it comes to tickets, with the first few rows directly behind the goal in the Hammersmith End filled with fans not celebrating Ryan Babel’s goal against his former club. Unashamed Liverpool fans were so obviously in every stand that it was embarrassing.

Seemingly the club doesn’t care about who buys the tickets. If people buy them, Fulham fans or not, they will continue to charge the extortionate prices. The decision to not have reduced prices for concessions and young people is leading to true fans not being able to afford to go. Parents are having to spend a ridiculous amount of money if they want to involve their children in supporting the club, so it’s becoming a massive put off. For me Fulham has always been about family values and inclusion, but with the current ticketing policy, these values seem to be a thing of the past. What an absolute shame.

Our good friends at the Fulhamish Podcast have been particularly vocal over the ticket policy at the club. The #StoptheGreed campaign was supposed to be properly launched this Saturday in the early kick-off against the Champions, with fan funded banners displayed in the Hammersmith End with the aim of making a point to the Fulham authorities that as a fanbase we are not happy with the approach the club is taking. Unfortunately the club has decided to not let the banners into the ground because they don’t want anything, …”not supportive of the team.” Then why flood the home sections of the grounds with Liverpool fans? Why charge so much money that real fans are shunted out in favour of tourists and touts?

When we got promoted last season, Fulham were faced with an opportunity to further increase a swelling fanbase. We may have lost a number of fans following our relegation back in 2014, but over our four years away from the top flight, we gained a heck of a lot of new followers. The brand of football that got us promoted was so attractive and our identity as a family club meant that many people without a club found a home on the banks of the Thames. All that good work has possibly been undone this season, and it’s not because of the shambles on the pitch, it’s what is unfolding off it. I’d advise the club to think carefully about what is next. Stop ignoring the voice of your loyal supporters or else I’d imagine that people will start voting with their feet. We are facing another relegation and club’s in our position need their fans more than ever. Don’t push us away.

#StopTheGreed

Emerald Isle Diamonds

As much as I enjoy international football, I have never really been absolutely buzzing for international breaks to come around. They always seem to disrupt the domestic football and there aren’t as many matches. At the minute, however, any distraction form the Premier League is a welcome one. Things haven’t been pretty on the banks of the Thames, to put it mildly. So instead of talking about Fulham’s disaster of a season, I thought I’d talk about another favourite topic of mine, Northern Irish and Irish players who have played throughout the years in our famous white shirt. I’ll limit to just my top 5, as I have a game to get to tonight at Windsor Park at 1945!

  1. Aaron Hughes

The Hangeland-Hughes partnership will go down as one of the greatest centre back pairing in Fulham’s Premier League history. Under the guidance of Roy Hodgson Fulham became defensively sound, something that we badly crave this season, and Hughes was vital in this. He racked up 250 appearances for Fulham across all competitions and scored a handful of goals along the way. He was a crucial part of both the Greatest Escape year in 2008 and then the Europa League run of 2010. He is my all time favourite Northern Irish player and captain .

2. Ollie Norwood

It might have only been a loan deal, but the decision to bring Norwood to Fulham turn out to be a stroke of genius. Norwood has always had a touch of quality about him, we have known that for years in Northern Ireland. He might try a Hollywood pass too often for some, but it’s that vision that has been so important for Northern Ireland. Last season at Fulham we badly needed someone to step in for Cairney when he was injured, and Norwood was the one to do that. He might not quite be the level of Cairney but he is what we needed at the time. And who could forgot THAT tackle in the dying seconds of the play-off final that prevented Aston Villa’s final chance? What a guy.

3. Damien Duff

Damien Duff celebrates his equaliser against Birmingham

Damien Duff was one of those players who when they are signed, you get very excited about. He may have been slightly past his prime but we all knew what he was capable of from his time at Chelsea and Newcastle. He was one of those players who had a sweet left foot, but played on the right for the majority of his time at Fulham. The Craven Cottage crowd used to get such a buzz when he would cut in from the right and have a pop at goal. He always had a bit of magic about him and I loved seeing him play at Fulham.

4. Chris Baird

Bairdinho. When he announced his retirement this year I was genuinely gutted. He has been such an important figure for club and country for years and there aren’t many out there quite like him. Baird was one of the most versatile players at Fulham, and he was happy to play wherever was required. He was a typical ‘leave everything on the pitch’ kind of guy, and those goals at Stoke City will stay in Fulham folklore forever.

5. Rodney McAree

Not many players can say that they have a chant that is still sang around a club 20years or so after they have left, but Rodney McAree can. I was too young to remember said goal, but I doubt there are many Fulham fans out there who don’t know about McAree’s goal up at Carlisle. Rodney also happens to be one of the nicest guys in football. He gave me one of my first exclusive interviews a couple of years back, something that I really appreciated. He owns a little part of Fulham history so he is rightfully remembered by the Fulham faithful.

Parker’s prideful Fulham

Premier League safety is vastly unlikely for Fulham after a horrific year back at the top sparked by dreadful recruitment, management and coaching all intertwining to create a relegation displaying everything not to do once you reach the ‘big time.’

Scott Parker mentioned in the lead up to the SW6 Derby that he wanted to see Fulham play with a bit more pace in attack, that came with the return of Ryan Sessegnon to the starting line up and quicker attempt to the final third, whether that came with longer balls or general speed of play from back to front – we saw longer balls utilised more frequently than usual but Tom Cairney was excellent in finding space and collecting the ball between Jorginho and the Chelsea back line before sliding some lovely passes in behind for the aforementioned Sessegnon typically.

Though individual mistakes were still visible, Fulham’s general performance was full of fight and had a period where they absolutely had Chelsea on the ropes. Scott Parker has already gained the support of Tom Cairney who has called for the permanent appointment of the former Fulham captain, and whilst we must be wary to avoid the Kit Symons experiment, this feels different. I think Scott showed some tactical intelligence on his first game as Cairney exploited the space behind the Chelsea midfield and he flipped Ryan Sessegnon to the right who saw some joy against Italy international Emerson. If not for some Man of the Match winning calibre saves from Kepa Arrizabalaga then Scotty Parker could well have salvaged at least a point from his managerial debut.

Back to something different about this ‘players coach’ appointment surrounding a ‘we’ve got our Fulham back narrative.’ Scott Parker throughout his playing career always seemed to command a certain level of respect and that saw him named captain, a leader who lead by example, Parker has always had the potential to have an authority over a team. Having set about his coaching ‘badges’ (my least favourite term in football, badges don’t exist) whilst at Tottenham Hotspur, this moment is years in the making. The return of Stuart Gray brings an aura of legitimacy also as an experienced and excellent coach in his own right which will help Scott through the early days of his management career whether it lasts 9 more games at Fulham or not.

Scott Parker’s Fulham made a nice start on Sunday and according to the former England international, have set a standard for the remainder of the season “I shouldn’t expect anything less, the challenge for me now is that needs to stay and how is this going to happen, making sure that it’s a given every single week.” He understands the core principles that this football club should never reject ‘passing football and a family football club.’

Every coach has to start somewhere and for Scott Parker (and Fulham), familiarity and a mutual understanding philosophically is a solid ground to build upon.

Ranieri’s replacements?

Claudio Ranieri has been relieved of his duties at Fulham Football Club (or vice-verse works too). In preparation for the event, I asked Fulham Twitter to send me their picks to replace the Italian at the helm of the football club and these are the five most popular choices analysed and evaluated with honourable mentions at the bottom.

Chris Wilder:

Wilder’s Sheffield United squad have a completely British squad utilising a 352 where Oliver Norwood acts as the midfield anchor and is having an excellent season, creating seven goals and only Leeds’ Pablo Hernandez has created more chances than the Northern Irishman that spent 2017/18 on loan at Craven Cottage prior to his permanent move to Sheffield.

Whilst Sheffield United don’t play with the pizazz and polish of a Leeds or Norwich, also contending for automatic promotion from the Championship, Sheffield United have the second best defence in the division and are only outscored by Norwich and West Bromwich Albion thanks mostly to veterans Billy Sharp and David McGoldrick.

I admire what Chris Wilder has been able to do at Sheffield United, but also at Northampton Town before then as he won League Two in impressive style. It’d be fascinating to see what he could do with a larger budget but as a Sheffield born professional with seven years of his playing career spent at Sheffield United, I’m not sure he’d leave the club where he has more ‘old-school’ managerial responsibilities for us in the same division with someone with zero footballing experience giving him the tools to work with and happy to sack him if it doesn’t work.

Oscar Garcia:

The man replaced by Slavisa Jokanovic at Watford, it was at Brighton where Garcia caught the eye for me at least. His possession based footballing style starved the opposition of the ball to the extent where they had the second tightest defence in the division. In his sole season at the Seagulls, he replicated Gus Poyet’s unsuccessful play off campaign from the previous year despite a lack of goals beyond top scorer Leonardo Ulloa.

The Guardian have a nice write up which hints as his tactical philosophy (https://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2017/aug/21/saint-etienne-unshackled-from-lifeless-approach-by-oscar-garcia). Groomed in Spain, notably ex-Barcelona, the comparisons can be drawn between Oscar Garcia and former Fulham manager Slavisa Jokanovic – the inability to really hold down a position prior to ‘arriving’ at Fulham, the aesthetics of their footballing philosophy and even the clubs (both coached Watford, Maccabi Tel Aviv and both have success in the outer reaches of global football – Jokanovic in Thailand and Garcia in Austria).

Oscar Garcia would be fascinating appointment, and arguably a correct one for the footballing parallels this squad was built for and accustomed to. Though question marks will no doubt hover over the futures of the likes of Tom Cairney and Aleksander Mitrovic with relegation, there’s enough there to replicate that style by looking back to those that were part of the promotion squad.

Graham Potter:

Under the radar, Graham Potter is having a really excellent first season at Swansea where he has harnessed an excellent crop of young players to play some eye catching, tidy football in a mid-table season. Though finishing mid-table isn’t quite the most appealing characteristic, it’s about where their playing squad belongs at this point in their rebuild following relegation whilst 9 of their 13 most used footballers this season are aged 24 or younger.

The Swans didn’t even reach £10m spent in their first summer back in the Championship yet with Potter’s coaching and some smart recruitment, Swansea are set up for the future with their cavalcade of prospects (including Dan James who was subject of £12m interest of Leeds in January). Potter has taken a tough situation and Swansea are 100% in a better place now than where they were when he took over and that is always a good sign of excellent coaching, this amongst some chaos and confusion in the upper management.

Graham Potter is a modern footballing man and a ‘proper’ football coach. He wants his teams to play good football, is happy to work with young players but brings all the values you want in the current footballing climate. Whilst he may not be ‘keen’ on leaving a club that offered him such a great opportunity, a bigger budget and life in London could tempt him. I think Potter has shown he’s no fluke or novelty, he’s a bright, young coach who will be in the Premier League soon enough, it’d be nice if Fulham were that club.

Slavisa Jokanovic:

I won’t go on too long, but Slavisa Jokanovic was in the top 5 of Fulham Twitter’s picks to be the next permanent Fulham manager. After the Ranieri experiment, it seems supporters may be showing their fickle side and saying “oh, it wasn’t quite you.” I hated the sacking at the time but to go into that side is another post for another day.
?We know what we get from Slavisa Jokanovic teams, it’s passing, attacking football that saw us become one of the more entertaining, appealing and eye catching teams in recent Championship history. We saw improvement with each year despite the club forcing a rebuild level of player movement with each window and that’s promising.

I don’t see this happening, but I wouldn’t hate it.

Lee Johnson:
?Perhaps aided by the ‘Fulham’ connection, his father Gary (current manager of Torquay United), grew up in Fulham and is allegedly a Fulham supporter. This has probably led to Fulham eyes more so than usual but his success already in his career before the age of 40 is commendable.

Lee Johnson got his first managerial job at Oldham at the age of 31, his first season was amidst a successful relegation battle. In his first full season, he rebuilt the squad and took the club to their highest ever finish in League One. He left Oldham for Barnsley in February 2016 where he stayed for a year before moving to Bristol City. Like at Oldham, Johnson has taken Bristol City from relegation contenders to play off pushers and this is despite a fairly frequent turnaround of players (since taking charge, he’s had to deal with the losses of: Jonathan Kodjia, Tammy Abraham, Luke Freeman, Aden Flint, Bobby Reid and Joe Bryan).

Johnson’s team impressed at Craven Cottage in our promotion campaign, displaying high pressing and quick interplay were rewarded making a squad that would ultimately go down as one of the most entertaining in the division as very ordinary. We were naturally quite disappointed when later that season we went to Ashton Gate and Bristol City played long ball, long throw and ‘kick-em’ football but I believe that to be a tactical decision against us (which was odd given performance earlier in the season). Johnson has dealt with adversity, receiving death threats and calls for his resignation but has won the Bristol City supporters around after the board kept faith (importantly). Lee Johnson also has an EFL Cup run to his name, a semi final no less that was ended by Manchester City and were a 92nd minute Sergio Aguero goal from a draw at the Etihad and a 96th minute Kevin De Bruyne winner from a draw at Ashton Gate – along this run, Johnson’s side knocked out Watford, Crystal Palace and Manchester United.

In terms of availability, it’s easy to sit here and say “why wouldn’t he join Fulham?” But Johnson has been shown faith, they’ve let him work through hard periods and he knows he’s backed by wealthy investors in the football club (not near Shahid Khan’s billions but billions nonetheless). We chewed up and spat out the saviour to our time in the Championship because the players purchased for him were poor and didn’t fit – so why would Johnson leave his situation for this?

Johnson is an intriguing option, and according to my Twitter feedback, is the popular option. I wouldn’t be unhappy for sure, but whether he’s the best option? I would have some doubts. Though to be fair, there’s doubts for every manager – no one is truly ‘risk free’ – which is why you shouldn’t throw away a good one for a poor run of form…

Honourable mentions:

Daniel Stendel (Barnsley), Steve Clarke (Kilmarnock), Dean Smith (Aston Villa), Aitor Karanka (unattached), Carlos Carvalhal (unattached), Nathan Jones (Stoke City), David Wagner (unattached).

And a couple from me not mentioned by others: Alex Neil (Preston North End) and Michael Appleton (unattached).

Fulham replace Ranieri with Parker

Fulham have sacked Claudio Ranieri after just sixteen Premier League games in charge and replaced the Italian with former captain Scott Parker as a caretaker manager.

Ranieri, who was only appointed in November as the successor to Slavisa Jokanovic, had run out of road at Craven Cottage after a dismal defeat at the hands of Southampton last night. The 67 year-old’s final game in charge saw Fulham start with three defensive midfielders and never look like seriously challenging one of their relegation rivals after conceding two first half goals.

Ranieri, who only won three of his games in charge and saw his side dumped out of the FA Cup at the third round stage by League Two Oldham, leaves Fulham ten points from safety with ten games left. Parker, who returned to the club this summer after a spell coaching Tottenham’s under 18 side, will take charge for the first time against Chelsea, one of his former clubs, in a west London derby on Sunday afternoon.

The 38 year-old, who made 128 appearances in a four-year playing career at Craven Cottage, completed his coaching badges prior to hanging up his boots and the former England captain has spent this season as Fulham’s first team coach.

Going down with a wimper

It’s around 7pm on 25th May, 2018. Ten of thousands of Fulham fans are in complete delirium at Wembley, completely overwhelmed at what we have witnessed. Our Fulham sealed promotion to the Premier League playing a wonderful, fun-filled style of football. We have done it with a group of players who clearly love playing with each other, and with an 18 year-old kid who has been a revelation in the side. We have owners willing to spend both on and off the pitch with a new stadium development incoming. The future is very bright for Fulham.

Fast forward to 10pm, 27th February 2019. We have just witnessed an extremely deflated Fulham side limp to a 2-0 defeat to relegation rivals Southampton. Our Italian manager, the man who led Leicester to the most unlikely of Premier League titles a few years ago, set his side up in a negative way, playing players out of position and leaving our best midfielder in Seri out of the side altogether despite saying that we had no injury concerns.

To say I’m angry at the state of affairs at Fulham right now would be an understatement. I’m furious. What a complete and utter shambles this season has been. What a wasted opportunity. While I think that Slav was out of his depth, I would honestly rather have stuck with him than have sacked him when we did for Claudio Ranieri. While there were some slight improvements at the start under him, the negatives since then have just piled up.

Alongside his frustratingly negative tactics and his insistence on playing Cairney out wide whenever everything good comes through him in the middle, it’s his treatment of Ryan Sessegnon that upsets me the most. He has turned Sessegnon into someone afraid of the football. Benching him, publically saying that he is out of form, not strong enough etc and then the few times that he does play, hauling him off at half time because of a couple of mistakes have all contributed to deflating the player of confidence . Sessegnon was our brightest spark last season and that was because he was given the opportunity to flourish. I’m from a teaching background, and I remember my tutor at university saying that our job as teachers was to create an environment in which pupils could, and wanted, to flourish. I believe that coaching football, or any sport for that matter, has the same principles. Ranieri should be laying the foundations for our players to become great, but instead it’s like the life has been sucked out of them, and it’s just heartbreaking.

We are so far away from that showing of unity last year. Our next three games at home are Chelsea, Liverpool and Manchester City- all games that 7 months ago we were relishing. Getting to see your club compete with some of the biggest clubs in the world is something that every fan should relish, but now I just wish that we could fast forward a month. We have a talented squad, but under our current boss I don’t see those players being able to play with any sort of freedom. At the minute we aren’t just going down, we are plummeting so fast that it’s a blink and you’ll miss it sort of scenario.

 If we are going down, I want us to go down fighting but to do that we need to remove Ranieri now. I don’t want us to rush into another managerial change, so my choice would be Parker until the end of the season to buy time to consider properly who we want in charge of the team. Another rushed decision isn’t going to do us any favours, but keeping Ranieri for me will do more harm than good.

#COYW